Professor Richard Gregory died a few days ago. Richard carried out a great deal of work into the psychology of illusion, and  his wonderful book, Eye and Brain, is responsible for sparking my interest in perception and deception.  Early on in his career he came across a cafe in Bristol with a pattern of tiling that produced a striking illusion (details here), and so I thought it would be nice to use the image to produce a small tribute to the great man……

If you haven’t figured it out, the lines in the illusion appear sloping but are actually parallel.

Here is Richard in action explaining another wonderful illusion…..

Are you a fan of his work?

16 comments

  1. Richard Gregory was one of the three founders of AI at Edinburgh—now all gone. Richard didn’t stay in Edinburgh long, but his intellectual legacy persists.
    He was my first scientific hero. Eye and Brain was my first introduction to the boundaries of the unknown in science—at school, science was absolute: all known and certain.
    Gregory’s vision for the Exploratory in Bristol changed public engagement in Britain, and public perception of science—he changed the way we see the world.
    I always looked forward to his periodic visits to Edinburgh. He continued to bring a new perspective and fresh excitement. To talk with him was a privilege and a joy.
    Sadly missed.

  2. There is a building in Melbourne, Australia which displays this illusion to great effect.
    It is quite startling to look at in real-life, as it is more effective in 3D.

  3. Have seen the building in Melbourne – it’s awesome. Did not know it was there and just sort of bumped into it (not literally!).

    So cool that someone would build it.

  4. There is a pub in Bristol tiled on the outside like that, and it makes me go squinty every time I walk past. I bet it’s even worse for all the people who have been in and had a pint or two…

  5. Richard Gregory was one of the three founders of AI at Edinburgh—now all gone. Richard didn’t stay in Edinburgh long, but his intellectual legacy persists.
    He was my first scientific hero. Eye and Brain was my first introduction to the boundaries of the unknown in science—at school, science was absolute: all known and certain.
    Gregory’s vision for the Exploratory in Bristol changed public engagement in Britain, and public perception of science—he changed the way we see the world.
    I always looked forward to his periodic visits to Edinburgh. He continued to bring a new perspective and fresh excitement. To talk with him was a privilege and a joy.
    Sadly missed.

  6. The video actually made me a little seasick until I figured out the right perspective.
    Love the checkboard illusion: so simple and yet so effective.

  7. Was fortunate enough to have him as a guest lecturer in my first year at UWE. Had a brief conversation with him afterwards about the Charlie Chaplin illusion. A true gent, and saddened to hear of his passing.

  8. when you keep pressing the up and down button to make the page shake it makes it really creppy

  9. Truly insightful bless you, I’m sure your current visitors could quite possibly want even more posts of the naturel maintain the excellent perform.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: